25 Years of Remodeling &
Renovation Experience

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Blower Door Testing & Thermal Imaging

Blower Door Testing

Blower door diagnostics test the "leakiness" of a structure, revealing where the building envelope is losing air to the outside.  By depressurizing your home and measuring the rate at which air moves through imperfections in the building envelope, we can guage how much energy is escaping through air leaks, and how much you're likely to save by fixing those leaks. Our building scientist pinpoints locations in the building envelope where – with the proper sealing – your home could do a better job of retaining energy. 

A blower door test will reveeal whether your home has the right amount of fresh air ventilation and whether it is from healthy or unhealthy sources.  Don’t assume the haphazard leakage in and out of a typical house is adequate ventilation.  With the blower door, we can tell if the air escaping through cracks in the building envelope is being replaced with air coming from undesirable sources such as basements, garages, and crawl spaces. 

We offer blower door testing as part of an energy audit or as a stand-alone service. Either way, blower door testing is an incredible tool that helps us provide a roadmap to improve a structure's energy efficiency.  

Thermal Imaging

Infrared DiagnosticsHaving your home evaluated with an infrared scanner sheds valuable light on the effectiveness of your home's thermal envelope. An infrared scanner reveals hidden air leaks and areas where insulation isn't performing, and can also yield some interesting surprises -- such as where an uninsulated hot water pipe or recessed lights may be contributing to an ice dam, for an example.

Thermal imaging is a valuable part of any good home energy audit, and a step that we guarantee to take with thoroughness and precision (although our experience tells us that it can also be a fun part of the energy audit for homeowners).

New Construction 

We provide blower door and infrared services in conjunction with full diagnostic energy audits and also to help new builders and large remodelers comply with the Washington Residential Energy Code.  If you'd like either of these services, or for more information about the benefits of blower door testing and thermal imaging please, contact us here.

Virtually all homes and built structures leak air in and out.  Regardless of the age, size, quality, or condition of the structure, it’s a safe bet there is some amount of unwanted air leakage.  Uncontrolled air leaks allow air you’ve already paid to heat or cool to be lost to the outside.  This makes the built structure less comfortable and energy efficient. 

For the typical older existing home in the US, the amount of loss from uncontrolled air leakage to the outdoors can be up to 30-40% of the home’s total energy use.  That can add up to a substantial amount of money out of a family’s budget.  Even newer homes often leak more air than they should, despite stricter energy codes and better building practices.  In fact, for modern homes built with super insulation, high performance windows, and energy efficient appliances, uncontrolled leakage to the outside can represent an even higher percentage of the home’s overall energy usage. 

Sealing air leaks in all homes and built structures is a cost effective thing to do.  Air sealing will pay for itself, particularly since more and more utilities now recognize the benefits of air sealing offer air sealing rebates.  

A visual inspection coupled with a blower door test will reveal where your home is losing air to the outside.  Our building scientist pinpoints locations in the building envelope where – with the proper sealing – your home could do a better job of retaining energy.  

Air sealing goes hand and hand with assuring your structure has the right amount of fresh air ventilation from healthy sources.  Don’t assume the haphazard leakage in and out of a typical house is adequate ventilation.  With the blower door, we can tell if the air escaping through cracks in the building envelope is being replaced with air coming from undesirable sources such as basements, garages, and crawl spaces. Sealing these leaks improves indoor air quality. 

Once we identify the specific locations where your structure allows air infiltration, we take measures to seal up the cracks and assure that good air quality in the structure is maintained.  We do this with a series of professional grade products that we use for just the right application.  Our expert technicians know when and where to install high expanding and low expanding foams, open cell and closed cell foams, and insulating foam board into the nooks and crannies of your structure – using techniques to reduce air leakage without compromising the structure’s durability, integrity, and beauty. 

After air sealing, we use the blower door to re-evaluate the number of times per hour the structure exchanges air with the outside.  We also test the safety of any combustion appliance zones.  It is sometimes appropriate to add new sources of fresh air ventilation to assure air quality remains safe and fresh.  These sources of ventilation can be passive, such as vented windows, or mechanical, such as bathroom fans, whole house ventilation fans, or heat recovery ventilation fans.  

Check out these air sealing videos from the University of Washington Energy Program:

 

Air seal you home for more comfort and energy savings.

Air sealing is often the least expensive and most effective way to improve the energy performance of your existing home or structure.

Virtually all homes and built structures leak air in and out.  Regardless of the age, size, quality, or condition of the structure, it’s a safe bet there is some amount of unwanted air leakage.  Uncontrolled air leaks allow air you’ve already paid to heat or cool to be lost to the outside.  This makes the built structure less comfortable and energy efficient. 

For the typical older existing home in the US, the amount of loss from uncontrolled air leakage to the outdoors can be up to 30-40% of the home’s total energy use.  That can add up to a substantial amount of money out of a family’s budget.  Even newer homes often leak more air than they should, despite stricter energy codes and better building practices.  In fact, for modern homes built with super insulation, high performance windows, and energy efficient appliances, uncontrolled leakage to the outside can represent an even higher percentage of the home’s overall energy usage. 

Sealing air leaks in all homes and built structures is a cost effective thing to do.  Air sealing will pay for itself, particularly since more and more utilities now recognize the benefits of air sealing offer air sealing rebates.  

A visual inspection coupled with a blower door test will reveal where your home is losing air to the outside.  Our building scientist pinpoints locations in the building envelope where – with the proper sealing – your home could do a better job of retaining energy.  

Air sealing goes hand and hand with assuring your structure has the right amount of fresh air ventilation from healthy sources.  Don’t assume the haphazard leakage in and out of a typical house is adequate ventilation.  With the blower door, we can tell if the air escaping through cracks in the building envelope is being replaced with air coming from undesirable sources such as basements, garages, and crawl spaces. Sealing these leaks improves indoor air quality. 

Once we identify the specific locations where your structure allows air infiltration, we take measures to seal up the cracks and assure that good air quality in the structure is maintained.  We do this with a series of professional grade products that we use for just the right application.  Our expert technicians know when and where to install high expanding and low expanding foams, open cell and closed cell foams, and insulating foam board into the nooks and crannies of your structure – using techniques to reduce air leakage without compromising the structure’s durability, integrity, and beauty. 

After air sealing, we use the blower door to re-evaluate the number of times per hour the structure exchanges air with the outside.  We also test the safety of any combustion appliance zones.  It is sometimes appropriate to add new sources of fresh air ventilation to assure air quality remains safe and fresh.  These sources of ventilation can be passive, such as vented windows, or mechanical, such as bathroom fans, whole house ventilation fans, or heat recovery ventilation fans.  

Check out these air sealing videos from the University of Washington Energy Program:

 

Air seal you home for more comfort and energy savings.

Air sealing is often the least expensive and most effective way to improve the energy performance of your existing home or structure.

Virtually all homes and built structures leak air in and out.  Regardless of the age, size, quality, or condition of the structure, it’s a safe bet there is some amount of unwanted air leakage.  Uncontrolled air leaks allow air you’ve already paid to heat or cool to be lost to the outside.  This makes the built structure less comfortable and energy efficient. 

For the typical older existing home in the US, the amount of loss from uncontrolled air leakage to the outdoors can be up to 30-40% of the home’s total energy use.  That can add up to a substantial amount of money out of a family’s budget.  Even newer homes often leak more air than they should, despite stricter energy codes and better building practices.  In fact, for modern homes built with super insulation, high performance windows, and energy efficient appliances, uncontrolled leakage to the outside can represent an even higher percentage of the home’s overall energy usage. 

Sealing air leaks in all homes and built structures is a cost effective thing to do.  Air sealing will pay for itself, particularly since more and more utilities now recognize the benefits of air sealing offer air sealing rebates.  

A visual inspection coupled with a blower door test will reveal where your home is losing air to the outside.  Our building scientist pinpoints locations in the building envelope where – with the proper sealing – your home could do a better job of retaining energy.  

Air sealing goes hand and hand with assuring your structure has the right amount of fresh air ventilation from healthy sources.  Don’t assume the haphazard leakage in and out of a typical house is adequate ventilation.  With the blower door, we can tell if the air escaping through cracks in the building envelope is being replaced with air coming from undesirable sources such as basements, garages, and crawl spaces. Sealing these leaks improves indoor air quality. 

Once we identify the specific locations where your structure allows air infiltration, we take measures to seal up the cracks and assure that good air quality in the structure is maintained.  We do this with a series of professional grade products that we use for just the right application.  Our expert technicians know when and where to install high expanding and low expanding foams, open cell and closed cell foams, and insulating foam board into the nooks and crannies of your structure – using techniques to reduce air leakage without compromising the structure’s durability, integrity, and beauty. 

After air sealing, we use the blower door to re-evaluate the number of times per hour the structure exchanges air with the outside.  We also test the safety of any combustion appliance zones.  It is sometimes appropriate to add new sources of fresh air ventilation to assure air quality remains safe and fresh.  These sources of ventilation can be passive, such as vented windows, or mechanical, such as bathroom fans, whole house ventilation fans, or heat recovery ventilation fans.  

Check out these air sealing videos from the University of Washington Energy Program: